Disraeli and Ireland

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  • Disraeli and Ireland
    • During his second ministry 1874-80
    • Disraeli saw Ireland as a troublesome possession trying to break away from British rule, in a similar fashion that the Balkan people were trying to win freedom from Turkey.
    • So what did he do?
      • Essentially nothing
        • He was unmoved by Ireland's troubles
          • Towards the end of his government, there was a severe agriculture depression
            • This depression caused the situation in Ireland to deteriorate further
              • Tenants were being evicted by landlords on a larger scale than ever-before because they couldn't afford to pay their rent
                • Yet Disraeli was still unmoved.
                  • He perhaps was  more preoccupied with other things such as foreign + imperial policy as well as domestic policy
    • Didn't see Home Rule as the answer to the country's woes
    • The defeat of Gladstone's  University Bill in 1873 - showed when possible, it was best to avoid Irish issues
      • So Disraeli was keen to ignore Ireland as far as possible, he had concerns that attempts to deal with Ireland would cause problems within his Party
    • A possibility to think about. . .
      • The defeat of Gladstone's  University Bill in 1873 - showed when possible, it was best to avoid Irish issues
        • So Disraeli was keen to ignore Ireland as far as possible, he had concerns that attempts to deal with Ireland would cause problems within his Party

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