Coping with pressure, crowded coats unit 2

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  • Created by: Hannah
  • Created on: 22-04-13 21:38
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  • Coping with pressure
    • Stakeholders-       individuals, groups or organisatations that have an interest in the development or outcomes in a particular project- they may be involved financially or emoctionally.
    • Changes in function or size of parks+resorts can cause conflicts
      • Regeneration of old industrial areas into high class residential developments
      • Gentrification
      • Loss of industries e,g. fishing
      • Inappropriate    tourist/leisure development in environmental sensitive areas
      • Pollution from increased failure of infastructure
      • Loss of traditional ways of life and facilities
      • Traffic congestion- new hotels developed
      • Coastal zoning-   accommodate    different users
    • Conflict matrix: give a few examples, talk about who is least/most compatible USE CASE STUDIES
    • Coral reefs: in shallow tropical marine waters. They protect low-lying coasts, rich in fish stocks, tourism appeal + biodiversity. Sensitive to change in water temp and quality, acidification, over fishing etc.
    • Mangroves: trees+shrubs that grow in saline coastal areas in sub/tropics.   Nurseries for fish + crustaceans. Mangrove roots trap silt to create new land. Protection from storm surges in low lying coastal areas. Being cleared for timber, then tourist sites
    • Salt marshes: low boggy coasts. Have been reclaimed for farmland. Provide habitats for plants and birds. The meandering creeks lower tide energy. Risk from: reclamation- due to idea of wasted space, pollution- from water, agricultural pollution- eutrification, pressure from developments  e.g. marinas
    • Land reclamation: process which land can be   substantially   improved or made available for some use e.g. treatment of derelict land
    • FIELDWORK AND RESEARCH. Beach pollution comes from 2 sources- left by beach visitors or deposited by high tides or dropped by passing boats.
      • Fieldwork project: comparing beaches, collect litter on a quantified stretch, compare findings e.g. plastic species, glass pieces etc.
        • Could devise beach quality survey, which record size, natural beauty, safety, degree of sand, service provision etc on a beach
      • Could devise beach quality survey, which record size, natural beauty, safety, degree of sand, service provision etc on a beach
      • Impacts of aquaculture: open net cage fish farms can discharge a lot of wastewater containing nutrients, chemicals + pharmaceuticals.
    • FIELDWORK AND RESEARCH. DESTRUCTION OF HIGH-VALUE COASTAL AREAS
      • CRITERIA: PRESENCE OF ENDEMIC SPECIES (PLANTS AND ANIMALS ONLY FOUND IN THIS AREA). BIODIVERSITY OF AREA. AESTHETIC VALUE. AMENITY VALUE.   VULNERABILITY   TO HUMAN IMPACTS
      • TECHNIQUE: COMPARE 2 COASTAL AREAS ON THE CRITERIA  RATING EACH FROM 0-5. IDENTIFY THEY WAYS THE AREA IS IMPACTED BY HUMANS. EVALUATE DEGREE OF ENVIRONMENTAL DAMAGE.
      • INTERVIEW STAKEHOLDERS.
  • Stakeholders-       individuals, groups or organisatations that have an interest in the development or outcomes in a particular project- they may be involved financially or emoctionally.
  • Changes in function or size of parks+resorts can cause conflicts
    • Regeneration of old industrial areas into high class residential developments
    • Gentrification
    • Loss of industries e,g. fishing
    • Inappropriate    tourist/leisure development in environmental sensitive areas
    • Pollution from increased failure of infastructure
    • Loss of traditional ways of life and facilities
    • Traffic congestion- new hotels developed
    • Coastal zoning-   accommodate    different users

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