Conformity map

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  • Conformity
    • Sheriff
      • aimed to investigate how group norms occured using an autokinetic effect.
        • A light appears to move within a dark room although it is stationary.
      • When asked individually how far the light moved, answers ranged considerably.
      • Participants worked in groups of 3 people, and group norms emerged when they announced their answers.
      • When asked as a group first, group norms emerged more quickly.
        • In an ambiguous situation, informational social influence is experienced.
    • Asch 1951
      • See how participants would conform to majority social influence in an unambiguous situation.
        • 7 male students called out answers when matching the length of a test line to a comparison line
          • Conformity on 32% of critcal trials
            • 6 accomplices and one naive participant calling out their answer second from last.
            • 74% conformed at least once,
              • even in unambiguous situations, there is strong normative social influence, or experience informational pressures.
            • even in unambiguous situations, there is strong normative social influence, or experience informational pressures.
        • 6 accomplices and one naive participant calling out their answer second from last.
        • 12 critical trials where unanimous wrong answers were given.
          • Conformity on 32% of critcal trials
            • 74% conformed at least once,
      • Zimbardo  1973
        • Investigating how readily people would conform to social roles in a prison environment.
          • male participants randomly given guard or prisoner roles.
          • Prisoners arrested at home, De humanised through stripping and being given a number identification.
            • Prisoners rebelled against the guards after 2 days. Guards performed roles with such zeal- emotional breakdowns of the prisoner stopped the trial after 6 days.
              • Guards wore symbols of power such as wooden batons and whistles.
              • male participants randomly given guard or prisoner roles.
              • Behaviour explained by situational factors and normative social influence, rather than dispositional factors.
              • People will readily conform to clear, established, stereotypical social roles.
          • Guards wore symbols of power such as wooden batons and whistles.
      • Kelman- types of conformity.
        • Compliance- publicly conformity to the views of a group, but maintaining different views privately.
          • Internalisation- the views of the majority become your own views, maintained without the presence of the group
            • Identification- adopting views privately and publicly, however views are dependent on the presence of the group.

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