Public Health Legislation

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  • Public Health Legislation
    • 1868  Act
      • This Act encouraged the improvement of slum housing or its demolition
    • 1855  Nuisances Removal Act
      • This Act made overcrowding illegal
    • 1871 Vaccination Act
      • This made sure the previous Vaccinations Act was obeyed
        • Fined parents if they did not have their child vaccianated
    • 1853 Vaccinations Act
      • Vaccinations made compulsory
        • Though no one was given powers to enforce this
    • 1875  Artisans Dwellings Act
      • This house made the house owners  responsible for keeping their properties in good order
      • Gave local authorities the right to buy and demolish slums if they were not improved
    • 1864 Factory Act
      • This made unhealthy conditions in factories illegal
    • 1866 Sanitary Act
      • First compulsory PH act
      • Work of John Simon
      • Made local authorities responsible for sewers, water and street cleaning
    • 1848 Public Health Act
      • Central Board of Health set up, which was abolished 10 years later
      • The Act encouraged local boards to be set up
      • The Act encouraged local boards to be set up
      • To  appoint a medical officer, provide sewers, inspect lodging houses and check food which was offered for sale
    • 1875 Public Health Act
      • Bought together a range of Acts
      • Covering sewerage and drains, water supply, housing and disease
      • Local authorities had to appoint Medical Officers in charge of public health
      • Local sanitary inspectors were appointed to look after slaughterhouses and prevent contaminated food from being sold
      • Local authorities were ordered to:
        • Collect rubbish
        • Supply fresh water to their citizens
        • Cover sewers and keep them in good conditions
        • Untitled

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