Cognitive Explanation for OCD

Small Mindmap I did in Class, One of the explanations for OCD - Cognitive. 

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  • Created by: Rachelll
  • Created on: 23-03-13 11:51
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  • Cognitive Explanation for OCD
  • 4 Characteristics
    • They are more  likely to suffer from depression
    • Cognitive Explanation for OCD
  • Very high moral standards and standards of conduct
    • 4 Characteristics
      • They are more  likely to suffer from depression
  • Believe that their obsessive thoughts are just like performing the behaviour
    • Harmful to others
      • Believe that their obsessive thoughts are just like performing the behaviour
      • Believe that they have control over their thoughts and behaviours
        • Evaluation
          • Helps to explain how OCD is maintained
        • Offers an explanation of the establishment + maintenance of the disorder
          • Evaluation
            • Helps to explain how OCD is maintained
        • Does not explain why we have these thoughts in the first place
          • 2) Catastrophic misinterpretation of the thought
            • Rachmans' 4 steps
              • 1) Presence of obsessional thoughts or images
              • 3) Fear and high level of anxiety
              • 4) Attempts to resist and avoid thoughts
          • 3) Fear and high level of anxiety
          • 4) Attempts to resist and avoid thoughts
          • Rachmans' 4 steps
            • 1) Presence of obsessional thoughts or images
          • Habituation Training
            • Repeated exposure to the feared object/situation
          • Successful treatment
            • Habituation Training
              • Repeated exposure to the feared object/situation
          • Unethical - protection of participants + Right to withdarw
            • However, participants do need consent before starting the treatment

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