Cognitive Theory AN

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  • Created by: rosannaaa
  • Created on: 05-04-18 16:51
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  • COG DISTORTION - faulty, biased and irrational ways of thinking that mean we perceive ourselves, other people and the world inaccurately.
    • COGNITIVE THEORY (AN)
      • COGNITIVE INFLEXIBILITY - Treasure and Schmidt 2013 proposed a Cognitive Interpersonal Maintenance Model of Anorexia
      • The core of AN is cog distortion about body shape and weight. Disturbed perception of body image.
      • Their weight loss is a resolution to a problem that no longer exists.
      • IRRATIONAL BELIEFS - also called dysfunctional thoughts - interfere with happiness.
  • patients adopt strict, inflexible rules about eating with any breaking of these rules leading to sense of guilt and failure.
  • Key irrational belief is perfectionism, applied to all areas of life.
  • IRRATIONAL BELIEFS - 'if i don't control my weight, i'm worthless'. Lack rational sense.
  • Perfectionism - view that they must meet demanding standards all the time, and failure to do so is judged.
  • Perfectionism is accompanied by intense record keeping, making sure they reach their goals.
  • Makes features of AN worse and more resistant to treatment
  • Hewitt et al 2003 claim that perfectionism is not satisfied when goals are achieved. But, when they reach their targets they merely set their standards higher
  • Forever pursuing an unrealistic goal.
  • Suggesting that sufferers find it difficult to switch fluently from one task to another requiring different set of cognitive skills.
    • COGNITIVE INFLEXIBILITY - Treasure and Schmidt 2013 proposed a Cognitive Interpersonal Maintenance Model of Anorexia
  • They apply the same skills in changed situation where these skills are no longer useful.
  • This research indicates this may be a cognitive deficit leading to development of anorexia.
  • Vulnerable, they find it hard to switch to a more adaptive way of thinking about their body shape and size.

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