Aeneas's Characterisation Books 1-6

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  • Created by: imonewman
  • Created on: 11-03-16 15:33
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  • Characterisation of Aeneus
    • Piety
      • The roman ideal of devotion to the Gods, family, friends and ancestors.
        • Aeneus's priorities when leaving Troy are his family and the gods. This is shown by when he carries Anchises on his back, when he asks for the household gods to be transported, and holding Ascanius's hand whilst fleeing.
          • This image is metaphorical for Aeneus's responsibility to found the Roman people. This is presented by the social and religious aspects of Anchises and the household gods. Ascanius himself represents the future generation and their capability to inherit all Aeneus will achieve,
    • Family-orientated
      • Runs to save Creusa in Book 2, makes sure Anchises and Ascanius are in a safe place
        • Carries Anchises on his back, and when Anchises says he will not leave Troy, Aeneus says if he does so, he will stay too
    • Accomplished
      • The many divine interventions Aeneus receives amplifies his impressive status, and also furthers his suitability to become the future founding father of the Roman people.
        • Venus disguising herself to inform Aeneus of Dido's past in  Book 1
        • The negative interventions of Juno are counteracted by Virgil's childish and narrow-minded depiction of her. The audience knows her actions are unjustified.
        • Neptune stopping Aeolus's storm from sinking Aeneus' ships in Book 1
    • Instinctive
      • At times Aeneus is ruled by his emotions. They have a great power in influence in his choices, and often intervention is required to stop him.
        • Nearly killing Helen in Book 2. Aeneus feels overpowered by his hatred for Helen, and would have killed her if it were not for Venus's intervention
          • Though this can be seen as negative, in this instance Aeneus's hatred for Helen reflects his devotion to Troy. She is partly responsible for its destruction, and his powerful emotions exhibit his passion for Troy.
        • Attempting to save Creusa in Book 2. Aeneus enters a panicked frenzy upon realising Creusa is missing, illustrating his capacity for passion and devotion to his wife.
          • Though this can be seen as negative, in this instance Aeneus's hatred for Helen reflects his devotion to Troy. She is partly responsible for its destruction, and his powerful emotions exhibit his passion for Troy.
          • It must be noted most of the examples are taken from Book 2, which to Aeneus happens in the past tense. Virgil may have intended to exhibit growth in Aeneus's character by showing his previous weaknesses and how he has learned from them.

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09icleg

woop woop!!!! mad tings

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