Changes in the Rural-Urban Fringe

Refers to AQA A2 Geography

Ecosystems: Change and Challenge Module

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  • Changes in the Rural-Urban Fringe
    • Problems
      • Seen as an attractive location for business parks, airports, theme parks and high-cost, executive homes.
      • Pressures for development include the need for improved transport networks, landfill sites and sewage works.
      • 500,000 new homes needed in the next 25 years, which will involve expanding urban areas.
      • Open countryside in the rural-urban fringe area is frequently degraded.
        • Fly-tipping
        • Illegal encampments
        • Trespass
        • Vanalism
    • Policies for sustainable development
      • Recent government policy in favour of sustainable development of the rural-urban fringe with recycling of derelict or degraded land.
        • Planting of woodland to improve local landscapes.
        • Creation of country parks, which are seen as relatively undamaged and harbour more natural plant communties.
          • Potential breeding sites for bird species such as lapwing and skylark which nest on the ground.
    • What is the rural-urban fringe?
      • The countryside immediately surrounding towns and cities
      • Defined in 1942 by George Wehrwein as 'the area of transition between well recognised urban land uses and the area devoted to agriculture.'
      • Many rural-urban fringes are designated green belts, with regulations strictly controlling new developments.
    • Why is the rural-urban fringe attractive?
      • Seen as an attractive location for business parks, airports, theme parks and high-cost, executive homes.
      • Pressures for development include the need for improved transport networks, landfill sites and sewage works.
      • 500,000 new homes needed in the next 25 years, which will involve expanding urban areas.
      • Land values high due to speculation regarding potential for future development.
      • Beliefs that derelict, unkept lands have advantages when it comes to gaining planning permission.
        • Secondary succession may have begun on untended fields with the growth of weeds, thorns and brambles making land appear unsightly

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