Blacks outside the South in Late1945

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  • Blacks outside the South in Late 1945
    • Black Political Rights outside the South
      • Better than in the south
      • They had voting rights
        • They were able to vote in Late 1945, but did not result in sympathetic representatives.
      • No Black elected officals
        • Only two Black members of Congress, Representative William Dawson from Chicago, and Adam Clayton Powell.
      • Blacks were still not equal to Whites
    • Social and Economic Equality
      • Their Social position was not equal to whites.
        • Whites did not want to live near blacks.
      • There was no legal segregation of the races, set down in the law (De Jure)
        • Whites did not want their children to be educated alongside blacks.
      • Their Economic position was better than the south.
      • There was segregation of the races, in fact, rather than in the law (De Facto)
        • The black population of cities such as Philadelphia, Boston and Detroit, were concentrated in Ghetto areas, where homes and schools for blacks were inferior to those for Whites.
      • Their economic positions were not equal to Whites.
        • White-owned companies were often reluctant to employ Blacks
    • Blacks and Law
      • Their legal positions were better than the South.
      • Blacks were not equal to Whites in legal positions.
        • Black Policeman were a rarity.
          • Blacks were discriminated against in law courts, and by the police.
            • Malcom X's sentence for his criminal activities in 1946 would be far harsher than that given to a white man found guilty of the same crimes.
      • Blacks were discriminated against in law courts, and by the police.
        • Malcom X's sentence for his criminal activities in 1946 would be far harsher than that given to a white man found guilty of the same crimes.

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