Attitudes to Eating Behaviour - Culture and Learning

HideShow resource information
  • Created by: Amy
  • Created on: 15-01-13 17:51
View mindmap
  • Attitudes to Eating Behaviour
    • Familiarity and Learning
      • Birch and Marlin
        • Exposure of 2 year olds to a new food over a 6 week period
          • increased preference for that food
        • A minimum of 8-10 exposures were needed for the initial dislike to change to a preference
          • neophobia - avoidance of unfamiliar foods. the children learn that the food is safe
      • Mothers usually provide most food to a child
        • Mother's attitude will affect child's preference
          • Children are also exposed to their peers eating behaviours and widespread advertising
        • Ogden
          • Found a positive correlation between mother's and children's diets
        • Parents often use operant conditioning to change a child's eating behaviour (rewards and punishment)
      • Taste aversion
        • Gastroenteritis after eating mussells will make you learn not to eat this food again as it will make you ill
          • This is essentially a punishment
        • Parents  encourage the eating of disliked goods with the promise of a disired food later
          • You can have ice cream if you eat all of your broccoli
      • Lepper et al
        • 28 children told story involving imaginary foods: hupe and hule
          • Condition 2: told a sotry in which a mother tells her child they can have hupe IF you eat hule or the other way round
            • Contingent condition (having one food is contingent on first having the other)
              • Expressed a preference for the food that had been used as a reward for eating the other food
                • Argued that their preferred food choice tasted better even though they had never eaten it
          • Supports operatant condition in eating behaviour
            • Because children learn through rewards as they show they have a preference for the food used as a reward
        • Evaluation
          • High internal validity
          • Counterbalanced and used fake food names to eliminate a preference for sound or food
          • Cause and effect can be established
          • Small sample, hard to generalise
      • Social Learning Theory
        • Learn through role models
        • Vicarious reinforcement - witness role model being rewarded for their eating choics
        • Duncker
          • Children observed: mother, random adult, fictional hero, a friend and a random child making food choices
          • Greatest food preference change was with: OLDER CHILD, FRIEND, MUM OR HERO
            • more likely to eat an unfamiliar food is they had seen their mother do it
              • Parental behaviour is essential part of learning
    • Culture
      • different parts of the world, kids grow up to have different attitudes to food
        • UK like chips, nuggets, sweets and pizza
        • Indian kids like spicy food is nicer
        • Japanese like fish
      • Wardle et al
        • 16,000 young adults in 21 European countries surveyed about diet
        • Males less likely to have balanced diet
        • Sweden, Norway and Denmark most fibre eaten
        • Italy, Portugal and Spain least fibre but most fruit
        • England and Scotland least fruit
        • salt intake high in Poland and Portugal and lowest in Sweden and Finland
        • Those on a 'Mediterranean diet' have lower levels of heart disease and obesity
          • Lower levels of processed foods and more natural products being used
        • Ethnocentric
        • Social desirability bias
          • Only Young aduls
        • Ethical
      • Lesham
        • Muslims more carbs, twice as high as Christians
          • Muslims ate more protein, fats and salt
            • But BMI was the same
        • Compared diets of two different ethnic communities in Israel but lived in same area
          • Before living in the same area they had lived in different environments
          • Untitled
          • Same access to shops and food
          • Strict religious reasons of eating foods
      • Education - Xie Et al
        • Adolescents whose parents were more educated had higher intake of carbs, protein, fibre, vitimin A and calcium and ate more fruits and vegetables
      • Income
        • Cost of food influences food choice/ more likely to have unbalanced diet
        • Xie et al
          • Children from high income families had greater intake of polyunsaturated fats, protein, calcium and iron
          • Their peers from lower socioeconomic groups had diets that had higher intake of meat, full fat milk, fats, sugar, potatoes and cerals combined with lower levels of fruit, brown bread and vegetables
  • Indian kids like spicy food is nicer
  • Wardle et al
    • 16,000 young adults in 21 European countries surveyed about diet
    • Males less likely to have balanced diet
    • Sweden, Norway and Denmark most fibre eaten
    • Italy, Portugal and Spain least fibre but most fruit
    • England and Scotland least fruit
    • salt intake high in Poland and Portugal and lowest in Sweden and Finland
    • Those on a 'Mediterranean diet' have lower levels of heart disease and obesity
      • Lower levels of processed foods and more natural products being used
    • Ethnocentric
    • Social desirability bias
      • Only Young aduls
    • Ethical
  • Compared diets of two different ethnic communities in Israel but lived in same area
    • Before living in the same area they had lived in different environments
    • Untitled
    • Same access to shops and food
    • Strict religious reasons of eating foods

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar Psychology resources:

See all Psychology resources »See all Eating disorders resources »