ATHENS - Women At The Thesmephoria

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  • THE WOMEN AT THE THESMEPHORIA, ARISTIOPHANES (411BC, DURING DIONYSIA)
    • ACT ONE, Scene One
      • 'Buggered him' - SEXUAL HUMOUR
      • Euripedes talks of the women's plot to murder him
      • Agathon rolls out on the ekkylema, wearing women's clothing - SLAPSTICK HUMOUR
      • Talk of "straddling position", mimics Phaedra - HIPPOLYTUS, PARODY
      • Agathon refuses to go along with plot references 'you love your life, your father does too' - ALECESTIS, PARODY
      • When Mnesilochus agrees, they shave him, depiction of phalluses dangling - SEXUAL HUMOUR
    • ACT ONE, Scene Two
      • Women congregate at the Thesmephoria = semi-political, SEXIST HUMOUR
      • Depict women as baby-stealers ("mouth bunged up with wax") and drunks ("we drank again" when questioning Mnesilochus about the rites - SEXIST HUMOUR, COULD BE SATIRE REFLECTING MALE FEARS
      • Comedic scene where Mnesilochus is hiding his phallus from Mica - SLAPSTICK HUMOUR
      • Mnesilochus steals Mica's baby - TELEPHUS, PARODY = it turns out to be a wine skin
      • PARABISIS SCENE where women address men in the audience - could be comedic or reflection of true suffering - talk about dogs guarding doors and being locked up
      • Aristophanes mocking of cowards in battle e.g. CLEONYMUS, SATIRE
    • ACT TWO
      • Crytlla's ignorance - SEXIST HUMOUR
      • Mention Euripedes' play Helen - PARODY
      • Scythian guards Mnesilochus - SLAPSTICK HUMOUR, DUE TO ACCENT/MANNERISMS
      • Mnesilochus writes on tablets - alike to PALAMEDES but no oars due to war
      • Euripedes comes down on the mechane - SLAPSTICK HUMOUR, alike to Gods at end of tragic plays
      • Euripedes distracts the Scythian with a prostitute - SLAPSTICK HUMOUR
      • Women agree to make up at the end with Euripedes - POSSIBLE SATIRE, COULD REFLECT ARISTOPHANES VIEW OF WAR

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