The development of active Leisure and Recreation

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  • AS Physical Education - The development of active leisure and recreation
    • Requirements for participation
      • Fitness - fitness or a lack of fitness if often why people do not participate in physical exercise.
      • Ability - refers to the experience that an individual has has.
      • Resources - essential in order to take part in physical activity. It can be divided into three sections: physical equipment, sufficient people to take part and the money to pay for hire or purchase of facilities/ equipment.
      • Time - increased leisure time from work has been affected by an almost apparently linear increase in social demands.
    • Concepts of recreation and active leisure
      • Leisure  - A period of time spend out of work and essential domestic activity.
      • Recreation - the use of time in a manner designed for therapeutic refreshments of ones body or mind.
    • Contemporary concerns
      • Obesity - This refers to the degree of body fat over and above the accepted gender norm.
      • Coronary Heart Disease -  Result of the accumulation of fatty deposits forming plaques within the wall of the arteries that supply the myocardium, the muscles of the heart.
        • Risks of CHD
          • High blood pressure
          • High LDL 'bad' cholesterol
          • Menopause
          • Smoking
          • Obesity
          • Not enough physical activity or exercise
          • Low HDL 'good' cholesterol
          • dIabetes
        • Prevention from CHD
          • Avoid or reduce stress as best as you can
          • Do not smoke
          • Eat well- balanced meals that are low in fat and cholesterol and include several daily servings of fruit and veg
          • Get regular exercise: if your weight is considered normal get at least 30 minutes exercise every day. If you are overweights or obese you should get 60 - 90 minutes per day
          • Keep your blood pressure, blood sugar and cholesterol under control
      • Diabetes - is a disease that is characterised by the inability of the body to make sufficient insulin or alternatively the resistance of the body to insulin.
        • TYPE 1 - is insulin dependent and usually appears in young people aged 10-16 years old
        • TYPE 11 is non-insulin dependent and usually appears gradually, mainly in the over 40s
        • Can lead to:
          • Cardiovascular disease
          • Chronic renal failure
          • Retinal damage
          • Nerve damage
          • Microvascular damage, which may cause impotence and poor healing. Poor healing of wounds, particularly of the feet, can lead to gangrene and may result in amputation
      • High blood pressure is often referred to and linked with coronary heart disease.
        • - 120/80 or lower is normal blood pressure - 140/90 or higher is high blood pressure
        • - Optimal blood pressure is less than 120 mm Hg systolic and 80 mm Hg diastolic   -High blood pressure or hypertension is a condition in which blood pressure levels are above the normal range      -Blood pressure is considered high if it is 140 mm Hg and/or 90 mm Hg or higher
      • High Choleterol - too much can be bad for the body
        • Risk factors for high cholesterol
          • Diet - one that is high in saturated fat combined with lack of exercise may increase LDL cholesterol and decrease HDL good cholesterol
          • Family history - people are at higher risk if they have a direct male relative aged under 55 years or female relative aged 65 years affected by heart disease
          • Weight - being overweight may increase LDL and decrease HDL
          • Age and Sex - cholesterol generally rises slightly with age and men are more likely to be affected
          • Alcohol - drinking more than the recommended amount
      • Metabolic Syndrome -combination of medical disorders that increase the risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes.
        • Metabolic risk factors
          • Abdominal obesity
          • Atherogenic dyslipidemia
          • Elevated blood pressure
          • Insulin resistance or glucose intolerance
        • Factors contributing to metabolic syndrome
          • High triglycerides
          • central obesity
          • High blood pressure
          • Low HDL cholesterol
          • insulin resistance
    • Barriers to opportunity
      • Gender
      • Social class
      • Age
      • Ability/ disability
      • ethnicity race / religion
    • Bad stress
      • a feeling of being constantly pressured, hassled and hurried
      • sadness or depression
      • anxiety or panic attacks
      • physical symptoms such as stomach problems, headaches or even chest pains
      • problems sleeping
      • Drinking  too much, smoking, overeating or doing drugs
      • Allergic reactions such as eczema or asthma
      • Irritability and moodiness

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