Application of ethical theories to the right to a child

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  • Created by: mermaids_
  • Created on: 16-02-14 17:25
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  • Application of ethical theories to the right to a child
    • Christian ethics
      • Sanctity of life- especially important if some of the embryos are used for foetal research or are destroyed.
      • The child as a gift from God
        • 'Every human being is always to be accepted as a gift and a blessing from God'
      • The sanctity of marriage
        • A child should be raised in the context of a heterosexual, permanent relationship between parents.This approach prohibits homosexual couples or single mothers from using sperm donors or surrogates to become parents.
    • Utilitarianism
      • Would weigh up the pleasure and pain involved
      • All actions are judged by consequences
      • The happiness of the greatest number would consider the cost to the health service and wheather money could be better spent in life- improving care of the elderly
      • Preference utilitarian would consider that no ones happiness is more important than another's, so the happiness of the couple is considered
      • Utilitarianism does not protect the status of the embryo nor does it see it as sacred in any way
    • Kantian ethics
      • The categorical imperative demands that people are treated as ends not means.This would imply to the embryo if it is considered to be a person and any others involved, such as sperm/ egg donors and surrogates/
      • All humans should have the same moral treatment.
      • There is a danger of treating the creation of humans as just another consumer good.
      • Universalisation would question whether it is acceptable to offer IVF to every infertile couple
    • Natural law
      • Any means other than natural conception would be rejected including the idea that masturbation to obtain sperm is wrong.
      • Preservation of life and the belief that all life has equal status-the destruction of embryos goes against these primary precepts
      • Absolute theory- does not take into consideration the consequences of actions
      • It can be argued that the doctrine of double effects is relevant as the creation of spare embryos could be seen as an unintended consequence of IVF
  • Universalisation would question whether it is acceptable to offer IVF to every infertile couple

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