Animal Rights

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  • Uses for Animals
    • For Meat
      • For
        • Humans are omnivores; we eat meat!
        • We have evolved teeth specialised for tearing meat.
        • It is traditional and a part of some people's religion.
      • Against
        • Humans have evolved to the point where we do not have to eat meat.
        • There are alternatives to meat such as Quorn and soya.
        • The way animals are treated on farms, during transportation and in slaughter houses causes suffering for the animals.
    • Animal Testing
      • For
        • Humans are considered more important than animals, no one would allow their child to die if it could be prevented by killing an animal.
        • Experiments on animals save human lives, it's helped provide treatments for cancer and other serious diseases.
        • Testing products can help prevent humans from being harmed. People think that it is better that an animal loses their sight than a human.
      • Against
        • Humans have developed scientific methods to test things.
        • They could test it on a genetic level without harming animals.
        • Experiments are not accurate. Penicillin kills guinea pigs but has saved millions of human lives.
        • Animals shouldn't have to die for the sake of make up!
        • The experiments are cruel and cause immense amounts of pain.
    • Zoos
      • For
        • Zoos can protect animals from hunters and poachers.
        • Zoos will care for and feed animals that would not survive in the wild because of their age of health.
        • Zoos help breed endangered species and release them back into their natural habitat.
        • Zoos are educational and help our understanding of animals.
      • Against
        • Not all zoos care for their animals and keepers can be cruel and harm the animals.
        • Animals are kept in unnatural surroundings away from family groups.
        • Animals are kept in cages and enclosures that are too small which can cause the animals to become bored, aggressive, stressed, depressed and insane
        • The public can taunt the animals for fun.
    • Hunting
      • For
        • Hunting proponents argue that hunting is safe, effective, necessary, and inexpensive to taxpayers.
        • Since natural deer predators have been eliminated in many areas, hunters argue that hunting is necessary to perform the function of wolves or cougars in keeping the deer population in check.
        • Regarding ethics, hunting proponents argue that killing a deer for food cannot be worse than killing a cow or a chicken.
        • Hunting proponents also argue that reducing the deer population will reduce human/deer conflicts, such as car/deer collisions, Lyme disease and landscaping damage.
      • Against
        • Approximately 100 people die in hunting accidents in the United States every year, and unlike other forms of recreation, hunting endangers the entire community, and not just the willing participants.
        • Studies show that car/deer collisions increase during hunting season because hunters frighten the deer out of the woods and onto roads.
        • Hunting does not reduce the deer population because removing some individuals from the population results in more food per deer, which leads to the births of more twins and triplets.
        • Hunting is ineffective because state wildlife management agencies intentionally keep the deer population high, for hunters.
    • Pets
      • For
        • Many people consider their pet as a part of their family and treat them with love and respect.
        • keeping pets does not "use" the animals in the same way that factory farms, animal testing labs or circuses use and abuse the animals.
        • Pets are a good treatment for depression and other mental illnesses.
        • Giving an animal a home can prevent it from being put to sleep.
        • Animals and humans have been together for centuries.
        • Animals can be useful for people with disabilities by seeing or hearing for them.
      • Against
        • Animals suffer abandonment, cruelty, and neglect at the hands of abusive owners
        • We are unable to provide the full lives that these animals deserve.
        • Their lives are restricted to human homes where they must obey commands and can only eat, drink, and even urinate when humans allow them to.
        • Domesticated animals retain many of their basic instincts and drives but are not able to survive on their own in the wild; dogs, cats, or birds, whose strongest desire is to be free, must be confined to a house, yard, or cage for their own safety.
    • Racing
      • Against
        • Horses are whipped and forced to run around tracks that are often made of hard-packed dirt at speeds of more than 30 miles per hour while carrying people on their backs.
        • Horses begin training or are already racing when their skeletal systems are still growing and are unprepared to handle racing on a hard track at high speeds.
        • There are trainers giving horses/dogs illegal drugs every day, trying to make them faster.
        • Many animals end up in slaughterhouses in Canada, Mexico, or Japan, where they are turned into dog food and glue.
      • For
        • Some horses/dogs enjoy the competitiveness of racing.
        • Not all trainers treat horses/dogs badly.

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