Ancient Greek and Ancient Romans

Mindmap on the ancient greeks and romans for revision friday

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  • Ancient Greeks and Romans
  • Ancient Greeks
    • Ancient Greeks and Romans
    • Trade
    • Knowledge on the body and disease
      • As Hippocrates had built on Egyptian ideas, later the Greeks built on the ideas of Hippocrates
      • The work of doctors was translated into many languages and spread around the known world through trade
      • Greek doctors at Alexandria in Egypt began to dissect bodies
        • Galen proved that the brain controlled the body not the heart by using a live pig for demonstration
          • He cut the nerves in the neck so the pig could no longer squeal and so on
      • Greek philosphers realised that prayers were useless against illnesses such as the plague, and that epilepsy was not caused by the Gods
      • Hippocrates's book 'Air, Water and Places' suggests that dieases was caused by the environment
        • Therefore the door was open for an entirely natural theory of the cause of disease
      • Based on the theory that the natural matter comprised of four basic elements, Hippocrates came up with the idea that human body conisted of the four humours, which has to be kept it balance.
        • This lasted until afer AD1700 when proved wrong by Galen
    • Greek surgery
      • Greek city states were frequently at war, so Greek doctors became experts at first aid
      • They also learned about setting broken and dislocated bones
      • We dont know however, that Greek surgeons actually  successfully operated inside the body, since there was no anaesthetics and only herbal antiseptics
    • Greek methods of diagnoses and treatments
      • The greek doctors made their medical diagnosis based on examination of their patient head to foot - clinical observation
      • They did this while referring to Hippocractic textbooks, which told them how to do the examination and what the disease might be
      • The ancient Greeks came to see illness had a natural cause, and could not be cured by appealing to the Gods
      • They therefore found natural cures using natural substances such as garlic, vinegar and honey
  • Ancient Romans
    • Roman civilisation
      • Ancient Romans
        • They preferred prevention to cure, and put energies into public health facilities rather than following medical theories from the Greeks
        • They developed a huge monolithic empire, which is ruled by a Roman emperor
        • Rome became immensely wealthy, but the Romans were down-to-earth people, and their wealth flowed into practical projects, rather than into philosophy and culture.
        • directed its efforts into amazing engineering schemes such as those of the baths, aqueducts and sewers of Rome.
        • they made an immense investment in their armies, the basis of their power
        • It was their observation of the health of their soldiers that led the Romans to realise the importance of public health
        • they brought over doctors from conquered Greece. Although officially medicine might have been considered unnecessary, these doctors became very popular.
        • The Romans believed in their gods, and in ancient times the influence they ascribed to these gods was very great
        • The importance of war for medicine
          • The need for a healthy army led Romans to think about public health.
          • The capture of slaves brought Greek doctors to Rome.
      • Rational thinking
        • Ancient Greeks
          • Trade
          • Knowledge on the body and disease
            • As Hippocrates had built on Egyptian ideas, later the Greeks built on the ideas of Hippocrates
            • The work of doctors was translated into many languages and spread around the known world through trade
            • Greek doctors at Alexandria in Egypt began to dissect bodies
              • Galen proved that the brain controlled the body not the heart by using a live pig for demonstration
                • He cut the nerves in the neck so the pig could no longer squeal and so on
            • Greek philosphers realised that prayers were useless against illnesses such as the plague, and that epilepsy was not caused by the Gods
            • Hippocrates's book 'Air, Water and Places' suggests that dieases was caused by the environment
              • Therefore the door was open for an entirely natural theory of the cause of disease
            • Based on the theory that the natural matter comprised of four basic elements, Hippocrates came up with the idea that human body conisted of the four humours, which has to be kept it balance.
              • This lasted until afer AD1700 when proved wrong by Galen
          • Greek surgery
            • Greek city states were frequently at war, so Greek doctors became experts at first aid
            • They also learned about setting broken and dislocated bones
            • We dont know however, that Greek surgeons actually  successfully operated inside the body, since there was no anaesthetics and only herbal antiseptics
          • Greek methods of diagnoses and treatments
            • The greek doctors made their medical diagnosis based on examination of their patient head to foot - clinical observation
            • They did this while referring to Hippocractic textbooks, which told them how to do the examination and what the disease might be
            • The ancient Greeks came to see illness had a natural cause, and could not be cured by appealing to the Gods
            • They therefore found natural cures using natural substances such as garlic, vinegar and honey
        • The greeks developed the use of logical thinking
        • The greeks still believed in the Gods, but their infleunce grew smaller as they acquired more scientific knowledge
      • They quickly started turning to natural causes for illness, and therefore natural remedies
        • Rational thinking
          • The greeks developed the use of logical thinking
          • The greeks still believed in the Gods, but their infleunce grew smaller as they acquired more scientific knowledge
      • Socrates developed the method of asking questions
        • The city built by Alexander called alexandria, was a centre for learning and study, containing the hippocratic collection of medical books
          • There was a feeling that medicine was for weaklings, and the Romans did not put great effort into developing it.
            • Roman civilisation
              • They preferred prevention to cure, and put energies into public health facilities rather than following medical theories from the Greeks
              • They developed a huge monolithic empire, which is ruled by a Roman emperor
              • Rome became immensely wealthy, but the Romans were down-to-earth people, and their wealth flowed into practical projects, rather than into philosophy and culture.
              • directed its efforts into amazing engineering schemes such as those of the baths, aqueducts and sewers of Rome.
              • they made an immense investment in their armies, the basis of their power
              • It was their observation of the health of their soldiers that led the Romans to realise the importance of public health
              • they brought over doctors from conquered Greece. Although officially medicine might have been considered unnecessary, these doctors became very popular.
              • The Romans believed in their gods, and in ancient times the influence they ascribed to these gods was very great
              • The importance of war for medicine
                • The need for a healthy army led Romans to think about public health.
                • The capture of slaves brought Greek doctors to Rome.
          • The Roman army developed some of the earliest hospitals.
            • Anatomical and surgical skill developed as army doctors treated war wounds

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