Act 3 Scene 18

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  • Act 3 Scene 18
    • Linguistic/ Grammatical Devices
      • Sentence functions
        • Marwood uses many imperatives especially in her second utterance. Manipulative nature and conversation-al dominance
          • "Then shake it off...but first prevent their plot."
        • Fainall uses a declarative to show that he is finished with his wife. Marks a turning point
          • "I am single and will herd no more with 'em"
      • Third Person
        • Fainall uses third person to reflect an earlier scene with "the nodding husband sleeps"
          • "let the lover still believe"
    • Theoretical Concepts
      • Grice's Maxims
        • Question the quality of one of Marwood's statements because she is having an affair
          • "Besides you forget, marriage is honourable"
      • Lakoff's Gender Theory
        • Marwood adhering to female talk by using interrogatives to make a statement. Possibly tentative
          • "I hope you are convinced that I hate Mirabell now?"
    • Literary Devices
      • Simile/ metaphor/ personificati-on
        • Fainall uses a metaphor to say he was a cuckold before he was married for exaggeration
          • "a cuckold in embryo"
        • Fainall uses extended metaphor for being a cuckold, which may have been funny to the audience. Horns are  humorous representati-on of a cuckold
          • "Sure I was born with budding antlers like a young satyr"
          • "My wife had added lustre to my horns"
            • Married for money
        • Fainall says he could have been like a stag, which is a symbol of masculinity. Cound be saying that he showed weakness
          • "If I had kept my speed like a stag"
        • Fainall uses a dehumanisi-ng expression to show how he does not value his wife and she has served her purpose. Compares her to a cow
          • "I'll turn my wife to grass"
          • "I'll herd no more with 'em"
            • Possibly an extension of this
    • Spoken Language Features
      • Length of turn
        • Fainall's first turn is quite long in comparison to his next ones because he is angry and ranting
        • Fainall also has another long turn because he is thinking aloud for the benefit of the audience
          • "Why, faith, I'm thinking of it.....who has not the wherewithal to stake."
      • Oaths and swearing
        • Fainall uses oaths to show his anger
          • "'Sdeath"
      • Interruption
        • Marwood interrupts Fainall to assert her dominance in the conversation
          • F: "That may be--" M: "You married her to keep you"
    • Rhetorical Devices
      • Triple structures
        • Fainall uses two of these to express his anger at Foible
          • "Foible's a bawd, an errant, a rank match-making bawd."
      • Incrementum
        • Fainall uses this to express his growing anger and show his misfortune
          • Triple structures
            • Fainall uses two of these to express his anger at Foible
              • "Foible's a bawd, an errant, a rank match-making bawd."
          • "To be out-witted, out-jilted, out-matrimonied."
      • Euphamism
        • Marwood uses this to say Mrs Fainall had premarital sex. Have to sound "proper"
          • "She had given up her game before she was married"
      • Repetition
        • Fainall's use of repetition within an interrogative sentence shows his indecisivene-ss
          • "The means, the means?"
        • Fainall uses a list to illustrate his lack of options Emphasised by the repetition of "that's over"
          • "I am married already; so that's over. My wife has played the jade with me; well, that's over too"
      • Listing
        • Fainall uses a list to illustrate his lack of options Emphasised by the repetition of "that's over"
          • "I am married already; so that's over. My wife has played the jade with me; well, that's over too"
    • Form/ Genre
      • Upper-class setting
        • Servants were always around so Foible knows everyone's secrets. Would have been a fear among rich audience
          • "she knows some passages"
    • Themes
      • Marriage
        • Fainall abused his marriage because he married for money not love
      • Money/ materialism
        • Fainall abused his marriage because he married for money not love
    • Structure
      • Scene comes after Sir W's arrival, which was a humorous scene. Provides contrast
      • The scene is the last in Act III and thus ends on a rhyming couplet
        • "All husbands must or pain or shame endure; The wise too jealous are, fools too secure"

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