Act 2 Scene 3

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  • Act 2 Scene 3
    • Linguistic/ Grammatical Devices
      • Sentence functions
        • Marwood and Fainall both use constant interrogatives because they are both defensive. This creates tension between them
          • F: "You are not jealous?" M: "Of whom?"
        • Fainall uses many interrogatives in one utterance.  Mostly rhetorical to challenge Marwood about  affection for Mirabell
          • "And wherefore do you hate him? ....An instance?"
        • Fainall's use of an exclamative immediately after an interrogative turns the interrogative into a rhetorical question. Sarcasm.
          • "Was it conscience then? Professed a friendship!"
        • Fainall uses a very short exclamative to express shock
          • "Frenzy!"
        • Fainall's use of numerous interrogatives shows how he is panicking
      • Lexis
        • Fainall uses the word "little" to patronise Marwood
          • "I see through all your little arts"
        • Marwood shows  manipulative nature when using emotive language to make Fainall feel guilty
          • "sacrificed my friendship to keep my love inviolate"
      • Sentence Length
        • Marwood uses a short declarative for emphasis
          • "I hate him"
      • Modal Verbs
        • Marwood uses a triple structure of modal verbs for emphasis of the certainty of being discovered
          • "It shall be discovered. You too shall be discovered; be sure you shall"
    • Theoretical Concepts
      • Grice's Maxims
        • Marwood questions the quality of one of Fainall's statements, possibly showing that she does not entirely trust him
          • "Ay?"
    • Literary Devices
      • Irony
        • Marwood makes an ironic statement, which highlights her deceitful nature and would probably have been funny to the audience, as Wishfort is meant to be laughed at.
          • "and could not see her easy nature so abused by that dissembler"
    • Spoken Language Features
      • Convergence
        • Fainall and Marwood converge, possibly to show how they are arguing
          • M: "It may be you are deceived." F:"It may be so."
      • Terms of Address
        • Fainall separates two declaratives with a term of address, which strengthens his accusation
          • "That I have been deceived, madam, and you are false"
      • Length of turn
        • Fainall has longer turns because he is angry
      • Schema
        • When Fainall realises they are in public, he begins adhering to schema and tries to comfort Marwood
    • Rhetorical Devices
      • Triple structures
        • Fainall's use of a triple structure highlights his use of sarcasm through exaggerated enthusiasm
          • "Only that one hope...put and end to all my hopes...he who must survive his hopes!"
        • Fainall also uses a triple structure to show impassionm-ent
          • "With infidelity, with loving another, with love of Mirabell"
      • Rhetorical questions
        • Marwood and Fainall show how they subconsciou-usly collaborate even when arguing. Both use rhetorical questions as argument tactic
        • Marwood uses these to express her anger at Fainall
          • "Do you reproach me? You, you upbraid me?"
      • Hyperbole
        • Marwood uses this for dramatic effect
          • "I never will forget it."
      • Incrementum
        • Fainall uses this to show how he hates being married
          • "Am I not married?... Am I not imprisoned, fettered?"
      • Euphamism
        • Fainall shows his low opinion of his wife by suggesting that she drives a man to death
          • "and would again be a widow"
    • Themes
      • Money/Mater-ialism
        • Fainall uses financial lexis in a metaphor to show how he is obsessed with money
          • "bankrupt in honour"

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