19th Century Social Reform

  • Created by: UrsyB
  • Created on: 12-04-19 07:40
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  • 19th Century Social Reform
    • Methods
      • For
        • Inspired by the Bible which says all men were created equal and should be treated equally
        • Reports that enlightened the public as to the awuful conditions began to emerge
      • Against
        • Some felt the government shouldn't interfere with daily life: "laissez-faire"
        • People believed the poor were poor because of their own bad choices and that the government shouldn't pay for them
        • Reform may limit household income, therefore damaging the poor it served to help
    • Key Individual
      • Lord Shaftesbury
        • MP for a rotten borough in 1826 and spent his life campaigning for worker's rights
        • President of the Ragged Schools union
    • Key events
      • 1833 - Shaftesbury began to lead the movement for factory reform
      • 1833 - 10 hours bill
      • 1840 - Children's employment commission
      • 1842 - Mines and Collieries Act prohibited children and women working underground
      • 1844 - Ragged Schools Union
    • Moral aim
      • Reform the working conditions of all factories
      • Support poorly paid people
    • Significance
      • Long Term
        • Government realisation they needed to support all in society
        • Humanitarian attitude of government
      • Short Term
        • Factory owners could and did change things
        • Change was slow and took many years
        • Government did little to help people immediately
  • Key events
    • 1833 - Shaftesbury began to lead the movement for factory reform
    • 1833 - 10 hours bill
    • 1840 - Children's employment commission
    • 1842 - Mines and Collieries Act prohibited children and women working underground
    • 1844 - Ragged Schools Union

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