1970's

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  • 1970's
    • Sex Pistols -  God Save the Queen
      • Background
        • Record sleeve featuring Queen Elizabeth II on a union flag background
        • 1977
      • Structure
        • intro - verse 1 - chorus 1 - verse 2 - chorus 2 - verse 3 - bridge - verse 4 - outro
      • Timbre & Melody
        • guitar sound of the sex pistols was created by a punk guitar powerhouse Steve Jones
          • Chuck Berry-style double-stop licks and metallic power chord progressions became standard for punk guitar
      • Harmony
        • verses centred on chords of A and D
          • creates a barre sound as there is no dominant, E
        • choruses centred on E and B, dominant and its dominant
          • gives the chords a much brighter sound
        • outro creates a sense of despair
          • descending melody line at each statement of 'no future'
          • harmonised with descending chords D-C sharp minor-B-A
      • Texture
        • guitar, bass and drums
        • DIY ethos of punk influenced the use of power chords and sliding, parallel chords
          • gave youthful, rawness to the sound without musical shaping
    • Pink Floyd - Another Brick in the Wall
      • Background
        • Part of a rock opera and the double album The Wall
          • Describes the life events of Pink, a character loosely modelled on Roger Waters
        • Reference to to Bassist Roger Waters' disillusionment with touring and publicity, performing in stadiums and feeling isolated
        • protest song about education
      • Structure
        • verse 1 - chorus - verse 2 (same lyrics) - chorus - solo guitar - fade out
      • Timbre
        • disco beat was the idea of producer Bob Ezrin
          • made the song more marketable as a single
        • use of children's voices was suggested by Bob Ezrin
          • track was originally too short to be a single so the verse was repeated with children's voices to vary the timre
          • previously used on an Alice Cooper track by Bob Ezrin
          • gives the single grittiness with the use of a North London accent of untrained school children
        • the guitar solo has a clean sound, less heavily distorted that the guitar sound of the two verses and choruses
        • the final fade out sound is an unanswered phone ringing
      • Melody
        • melody of the verses is very limited
          • melody of the first four lines is a minor third, D to F
            • 5th line is semi-shouted with the words 'Hey, teacher, leave them kids alone', and ascend to A, angrier in comparison with the first four lines
          • melody is scalic, adding a menacing quality of controlled anger and resentment
        • chorus has a range of a 4th from F down to C
          • the use of C natural with D minor make the song modal
            • in the Dorian mode, the mode beginning on D and using only natural notes
              • gives the song a sense of darkness and an older quality, in contrast with the 1970's disco beat
      • Harmony
        • the song begins with D minor chords in the Dorian mode
          • first two verses only use two chords, D minor and G major
          • choruses have two repeated lines, each set to the chords F-C-Dm
        • song doesn't have any perfect cadences, with is common in modal music
          • the plagal cadence in the verses adds to the modal quality of the song
      • Texture
        • melody and accompaniment, both in the sung sections and the guitar solo
      • Music Technology
        • recorded in France due to a tax problem with the band had encountered
          • sent to the UK via courier to be mixed
        • 24 track multi-track recorder
          • gave clarity and definition between parts
  • guitar solo is the most melodic part of the track
    • 32 bars of melodic shaping and clean guitar sound
    • Melody
      • melody of the verses is very limited
        • melody of the first four lines is a minor third, D to F
          • 5th line is semi-shouted with the words 'Hey, teacher, leave them kids alone', and ascend to A, angrier in comparison with the first four lines
        • melody is scalic, adding a menacing quality of controlled anger and resentment
      • chorus has a range of a 4th from F down to C
        • the use of C natural with D minor make the song modal
          • in the Dorian mode, the mode beginning on D and using only natural notes
            • gives the song a sense of darkness and an older quality, in contrast with the 1970's disco beat

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