Describe the RESULTS and CONCLUSIONS of your fieldwork and research into coastal management schemes and strategies.

Preview of Describe the RESULTS and CONCLUSIONS of your fieldwork and research into coastal management schemes and strategies.

Extracted text:

Describe the RESULTS and CONCLUSIONS of your fieldwork and research into
coastal management schemes and strategies.
Porlock (managed retreat) and Minehead (12.6 million hard engineering
schemes) SW Somerset
Fieldwork:
Cost ­ benefit analysis was used at Minehead ­ we used a land use survey (goad
map) to find out the value of the land being protected. We used this information by
putting it into a cost-benefit ratio ­ our ratio came to 2.08, therefore the
benefits outweighed the costs ­ giving us a conclusion that hard engineering
strategies were appropriate.
Flood risk can be calculated by multiplying likelihood (height above sea level ­ by
using a portable GPS device) by severity (value of buildings). These results could be
plotted on GE graph software, as colour gradients represent likelihood and height
represents severity. The polygon over Butlins holiday resort (worth £50 million
and built on former marsh land) was high and had a dark colour gradient
meaning it had a very high flood risk.
A bipolar evaluation of defences (from -3 to 3) creates an indication whether the
defences were beneficial for a certain area. E.g. you could see that the Victorian
groynes at Porlock were almost useless, compared to the hard engineering at
Minehead.
Questionnaires provide quantitative data which could be graphed up and means,
medians and modes could be calculated. Qualitative opinions of key stakeholders
could be typed into wordle.com (a word cloud of key words/phrases) to be analysed.
The main views of the residents of Porlock were that hard engineering
strategies were needed to protect their village.
Digital photos of land uses and features can be annotated.
The beach profile can be three dimensionally mapped to reveal areas of weakness
to flooding and erosion ­ this can show cross sections, from which the volume of
sediment could be calculated. This can be done by using clinometers and tape
measures.
Secondary Research:
local newspapers e.g. the West Somerset gazette, news archives on the
internet and local government websites e.g. www.westsomersetonline.gov.uk are
a good source of finding articles about past events.
Websites such as www.Where'sthepath.co.uk can provide old and new map archives which
can then be used to compare and analyse rates of erosion, land uses and contour lines to
show areas susceptible to flooding over time.
Flood maps e.g. on www.climatechangewales.org.uk can be used to see the prediction of
flooding in specific areas after a particular rise of sea level.

Related resources:

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Sign in to comment